Events

Upcoming Events

 

Recent Activities

NQN Seminar Series- Hybrid Classical-Quantum Algorithms (Aram Harrow, Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

September 15, 2021 @ 2:00pm – 3:00pm PT

Quantum computers offer power to solve some problems that go far beyond what is possible classically. But classical computers have advantages that are likely to persist even when we have large quantum computers: they do not suffer from decoherence, and they can access large data sets. In this talk, Aram will describe hybrid algorithms that combine the strengths of both platforms and will discuss challenges and opportunities for this class of algorithms.

This seminar is hosted by the Northwest Quantum Nexus (NQN), a coalition led by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Microsoft Quantum, and the University of Washington. Seminars hosted by NQN feature experts on quantum computing and its applications and support NQN’s goal of creating a vibrant industry that will contribute to the economic vitality of the region. For questions, contact diane.stephens@pnnl.gov.

Link to Live Event

 

NQN Seminar Series – Correlating materials analysis with qubit measurements to systematically eliminate sources of noise (Nathalie de Leon, Princeton University)

August 18, 2021 @ 3:00pm – 4:00pm PT

The nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond exhibits spin-dependent fluorescence and long spin coherence times under ambient conditions, enabling applications in quantum information processing and sensing. NV centers near the surface can have strong interactions with external materials and spins, enabling new forms of nanoscale spectroscopy. However, NV spin coherence degrades within 100 nanometers of the surface, suggesting that diamond surfaces are plagued with ubiquitous defects. De Leon will describe her group’s recent efforts to correlate direct materials characterization with single spin measurements to devise methods to stabilize highly coherent NV centers within nanometers of the surface. The group also deploys these shallow NV centers as a probe to study the dynamics of a disordered spin ensemble at the diamond surface. Their approach for correlating surface spectroscopy techniques with single qubit measurements to realize directed improvements is generally applicable to many systems, and time permitting, de Leon will describe their recent efforts to tackle noise and microwave losses in superconducting qubits.

This seminar is hosted by the Northwest Quantum Nexus (NQN), a coalition led by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Microsoft Quantum, and the University of Washington. Seminars hosted by NQN feature experts on quantum computing and its applications and support NQN’s goal of creating a vibrant industry that will contribute to the economic vitality of the region. For questions, contact diane.stephens@pnnl.gov.

Link to Live Event

 

NQN Seminar Series – Quantum Engineering of Superconducting Qubits (William D. Oliver, Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

July 21, 2021 @ 3:00pm – 4:00pm PT

Superconducting qubits are coherent artificial atoms assembled from electrical circuit elements and microwave optical components. Their lithographic scalability, compatibility with microwave control, and operability at nanosecond time scales all converge to make the superconducting qubit a highly attractive candidate for the constituent logical elements of a quantum information processor. Over the past decade, spectacular improvements in the manufacturing and control of these devices have moved the superconducting qubit modality from the realm of scientific curiosity to the threshold of technical reality. In this talk, William Oliver will present recent progress, challenges, and opportunities ahead in the engineering of larger-scale processors.

This seminar is hosted by the Northwest Quantum Nexus (NQN), a coalition led by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Microsoft Quantum, and the University of Washington. Seminars hosted by NQN feature experts on quantum computing and its applications and support NQN’s goal of creating a vibrant industry that will contribute to the economic vitality of the region. For questions, contact diane.stephens@pnnl.gov.

Link to Live Event

 

NQN Seminar Series – Algorithms for Near-Term Quantum Computers (Alan Aspuru-Guzik, University of Toronto)

June 9, 2021 @ 3:00pm – 4:00pm PT

In this talk, Alan will discuss an overview of some example applications for near-term quantum computers. He will start with an overview of the different families of algorithms that have been developed so far. He will then delve into the variational quantum eigensolver and the quantum computer-aided design algorithms and will finish with some discussion about the path forward.

This seminar is hosted by the Northwest Quantum Nexus (NQN), a coalition led by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Microsoft Quantum, and the University of Washington. Seminars hosted by NQN feature experts on quantum computing and its applications and support NQN’s goal of creating a vibrant industry that will contribute to the economic vitality of the region. For questions, contact diane.stephens@pnnl.gov.

Link to Live Event

NQN Seminar Series – Closing the Gap between Quantum Algorithms and Hardware using Compilation and Architecture (Margaret Martonosi and Prakash Murali, Princeton University)

May 7, 2021 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm PT

In recent years, QC hardware has progressed considerably with small systems being prototyped by industry and academic vendors. However, there is a huge gap between the resource requirements of promising applications and the hardware that is buildable now; qubit counts and operational noise constraints of applications exceed hardware capabilities by 5-6 orders of magnitude. Our work seeks to enable practical QC by bridging this gap: from the top with novel compiler techniques and algorithmic optimizations to reduce application requirements and from the bottom via system architectures efficiently exploiting scarce QC resources.

In this talk, we present two cross-cutting optimizations that narrow the applications-to-hardware resource gap. First, we present noise-adaptive compilation techniques that optimize applications for the spatio-temporal noise variations seen in real QC systems. Using real executions, we demonstrate average fidelity improvements of 3X using noise-adaptivity, compared to industry compiler tools. Second, on the architecture front, we study instruction set design issues considering application requirements and hardware gate calibration overheads. Current QC systems either use ISAs with a single two-qubit gate type or families of continuous gate sets. Using realistic architectural simulations based on Google and Rigetti hardware, we show that QC instruction sets with 4-8 two-qubit gate types are best suited for expressing application requirements, with tractable calibration overheads. In response to our work, several industry vendors have included noise-adaptivity and its extensions as part of their toolflows and adjusted device architecture to expose more native operations and hardware characterization data.

This seminar is hosted by the Northwest Quantum Nexus (NQN), a coalition led by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Microsoft Quantum, and the University of Washington. Seminars hosted by NQN feature experts on quantum computing and its applications and support NQN’s goal of creating a vibrant industry that will contribute to the economic vitality of the region. For questions, contact diane.stephens@pnnl.gov.

Link to Live Event

NQN Seminar Series – Circuit Model Quantum Computing with Neutral Atom Qubit Arrays (Mark Saffman, University of Wisconsin-Madison/ColdQuanta, Inc.)

April 21, 2021 @ 3:00pm – 4:00pm PT

One of the daunting challenges in developing a computer with quantum advantage is the need to scale to a very large number of qubits while maintaining the fidelity and isolation of pristine, few qubit demonstrations. Neutral atoms are one of the most promising approaches for meeting this challenge, in part due to the combination of excellent isolation from the environment and the capability to turn on strong two-qubit interactions by excitation to Rydberg states.

In this talk Mark Saffman will provide a snapshot of neutral atom quantum computing anno 2021, describe recent results implementing quantum gates in a large 2D array of atomic qubits, as well as efforts towards connecting multiple arrays, and present work in progress involving running VQE and QAOA on multi-qubit circuits.

This seminar is hosted by the Northwest Quantum Nexus (NQN), a coalition led by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Microsoft Quantum, and the University of Washington. Seminars hosted by NQN feature experts on quantum computing and its applications and support NQN’s goal of creating a vibrant industry that will contribute to the economic vitality of the region. For questions, contact diane.stephens@pnnl.gov.

Link to Live Event

Partner Event – Logical Abstractions for Noisy Variational Quantum Algorithm Simulation (Yipeng Huang, Rutgers University)

April 9, 2021 @ 9:00 am PT/12:00 pm ET

Existing quantum circuit simulators do not address the traits of variational algorithms, namely: 1) their ability to work with noisy qubits and operations, 2) their repeated execution of the same circuits but with different parameters, and 3) the fact that they sample from circuit final wavefunctions to drive optimization routines. Our key insight is that knowledge compilation—a technique for efficient repeated inference originating in AI research—can be generalized to work on complex-valued quantum amplitudes, such that the technique serves as the basis for a quantum circuit simulation toolchain geared for variational quantum algorithms.

In knowledge compilation, AI models such as Bayesian networks encode probabilistic knowledge about the world in a factorized format. The Bayesian networks compile down to minimized logical formulas that enable repeated inference and sampling queries with different parameters and new pieces of evidence. The features of the knowledge compilation approach—namely, 1) the ability to represent probabilistic information, 2) the ability to compile probabilistic model structural information into minimized formats, and 3) the ability to efficiently sample from the same model but for varying parameters and evidence—match the requirements for variational quantum algorithm simulation.

Our approach offers performance advantages relative to simulation approaches based on state vectors, density matrices, and tensor networks. The advantages are due to the more compact representation, the circuit minimization and memoization capabilities of our approach, and the storage costs for conventional simulators based on matrix representations. The improved simulation performance facilitates studying variational algorithms in the NISQ era of quantum computing.

This event is hosted by the IBM Quantum Hub at NC State. Please contact quantumcomputing@ncsu.edu with any questions.

Register for Event

NQN Seminar Series – Efficient Quantum Algorithm for Dissipative Nonlinear Differential Equations (Andrew Childs, University of Maryland)

March 24, 2021 @ 11:00am – 12:00pm PT

While there has been extensive previous work on efficient quantum algorithms for linear differential equations, analogous progress for nonlinear differential equations has been severely limited due to the linearity of quantum mechanics. Despite this obstacle, we develop a quantum algorithm for initial value problems described by dissipative quadratic ordinary differential equations. We also establish lower bounds on the worst-case complexity of quantum algorithms for nonlinear differential equations, identifying cases in which the problem is intractable.

This talk is based on joint work with Jin-Peng Liu, Herman Kolden, Hari Krovi, Nuno Loureiro, and Konstantina Trivisa.

Link to Live Event

NQN Seminar Series- Hartree-Fock and Quantum Technology (James Whitfield, Dartmouth)

January 20, 2021 @ 3:00pm – 4:00pm PT

The Hartree-Fock problem provides the conceptual and mathematical underpinning of a large portion of quantum chemistry. As efforts in quantum technology aim to enhance computational chemistry algorithms, the fundamental Hartree-Fock problem is a natural target. While quantum computers and quantum simulation offer many prospects for the future of modern chemistry, the Hartree-Fock problem is not a likely candidate. We highlight this fact from a number of perspectives including computational complexity, practical examples, and the full characterization of the energy landscapes for simple systems.

Hosted by the Northwest Quantum Nexus (NQN), a coalition led by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Microsoft Quantum, and the University of Washington. These web-based seminars feature experts on quantum computing and its applications, and support NQN’s goal of creating a vibrant industry that will contribute to the economic vitality of the region. For questions, contact diane.stephens@pnnl.gov.

Link to Live Event

NQN Seminar Series – Can Quantum Computers Speed up Gradient Descent? (Robin Kothari, Microsoft)

November 25, 2020 @3:00pm – 4:00pm PT

Gradient descent is a popular algorithm in machine learning and optimization and finds many applications in theory and in practice. Robin Kothari asks, “Can quantum computers speed up this algorithm?”

During this hour-long seminar, Kothari will discuss the meaning of the question, formalize the question in the context of first-order convex optimization and looks at prior work in this setting. Finally, he will answer the question posed in this context.

This talk is based on joint work with Ankit Garg, Praneeth Netrapalli, and a preprint of this work can be found on the arXiv.

Link to Live Event

NQN Seminar Series – Understanding the Computational Power of Physics (Nathan Wiebe, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory/University of Washington)

October 21, 2020 @3:00pm – 4:00pm PT

“What is the computational power of systems that obey the laws of quantum mechanics?” Nathan Wiebe will discuss how we
can understand this power through asking two types of questions:

  • What classes of problems could be solved by exploiting the natural physical laws of a system?
  • What subset of physical law can be simulated in polynomial time on a quantum computer?

Nathan will review recent results from Hamiltonian complexity, which gives a formal relationship between computational complexity and the problem of preparing particular states of matter in physical system. He will discuss the recent work he and his collaborators have performed to solve the converse problem of understanding whether all reasonable physical processes can be simulated in polynomial time on a quantum computer. He will include a specific example of simulation of the Schwinger model and how this simulation method paves the way towards understanding whether the standard model of physics can be simulated in polynomial time on a quantum computer or whether a more general computational model is needed to understand the computational power of nature.

Link to Live Event

NQN Seminar Series – Engineering Quantum Defects for Quantum Network Applications (Kai-Mei Fu, University of Washington)

September 2, 2020 @3:00pm – 4:00pm PT

Point defects in crystals are the solid state analog to trapped ions. Thus these “quantum defects” have gained popularity as a qubit candidate for scalable quantum networks.

Kai-Mei Fu from the University of Washington will introduce some of the basic quantum defect properties desirable for quantum network applications and give some illustrative examples of recent successes toward scalable quantum networks. Her talk will cover:

  • How single defects in crystals can be utilized to realize a quantum information network
  • What properties of defects are important for quantum information applications
  • How to measure these properties
  • Outstanding challenges in defect engineering that will require innovative solutions

Link to Live Event

NQN Workshop on Quantum Programming in Theory, Experiments, and the Classroom

September 16-18, 2020 

With the goal of bringing together Quantum Programming experts from academia and industry, who specialize in Theory, Experiment and in the classroom, the Northwest Quantum Nexus and the University of Washington are hosting 3 days of invited talks, poster sessions with a lightening round and breakout discussions during breaks. This workshop will be run virtually though Teams Live Events. More information to come.

Learn More/Register

NQN Workshop on Quantum Simulation

April 23-24, 2020

UPDATE: Coming soon

The Northwest Quantum Nexus (NQN) is gathering  together experts for a workshop on quantum simulation. This unique event is designed to foster an environment of open communication across fields, with a series of thought-provoking conversations around key challenges and including time for networking. Topics include chemistry and material simulation, nuclear theory/field theory, quantum simulation, software related stack, simulation ion traps, analog simulation, superconducting simulations and classical simulations. Follow the link below for more information including how to register for the event.

Learn More (coming soon)

Technology Alliance Discovery Series: Linda Lauw (Microsoft) and Nathan Wiebe (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

May 29, 2020

Designed to bring together Washington State’s preeminent researchers, innovative leaders, and elected officials who want to stay on top of important advancements being made in our state. Nathan Wiebe, Senior Scientist, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Linda Lauw, Microsoft, discuss Quantum Computing and its impacts.

Technology Alliance Discovery Series – Nathan Baker (PNNL) and Krysta Svore (Microsoft) )

March 13, 2020

Members of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Washington State University, University of Washington, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and other local research institutions are developing breakthroughs in research and technology that will have an incredible global impact. The Discovery series offers the broader community an opportunity to learn about new discoveries and cutting-edge technologies directly from our state’s leading scientists and innovators. Come see Northwest Quantum Nexus representatives Nathan Baker (PNNL) and Krysta Svore (Microsoft) give a talk on Quantum Computing.

Learn More

SIGCSE (ACM Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education)

March 11-14, 2020 (CANCELLED)

UPDATE: SIGCSE was cancelled but videos of the intended content (demonstration and paper) will be posted soon.

The SIGCSE Technical Symposium is the largest computing education conference worldwide organized by ACM Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education. It attracts nearly 2000 researchers, educators, and practitioners interested in improving computing education in K-12 and higher education. Microsoft Quantum leaders Chris Granade and Mariia Mykhailova will present workshops and demonstrations on various quantum topics.

Learn More

NQN Workshop on Quantum Computing, Sensing, and Simulation with Cold Atoms

February 20-21, 2020

The Northwest Quantum Nexus (NQN) is bringing together experts for a workshop at Washington State University to address the outstanding challenges in the use of cold atoms for quantum computing, sensing, and simulation. Workshop participants will discuss the state of quantum physics in the Pacific Northwest and beyond with a particular focus on the role of atomic systems in the future of quantum technology.

Learn More

Washington State University CUWiP

January 17-19, 2020

The American Physical Society (APS) Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics is a conference intended for undergraduate physics majors (CUWiP). The aim of CUWiP is to provide undergraduate women and gender minorities in physics the opportunity to attend a professional conference, to learn about the many different opportunities in physics, and to connect with other female physicists of various career stages to build supportive and inclusive networks. Bettina Heim, Microsoft Researcher, will give a tutorial on Quantum Computing in Q#.

Learn More

Northwest Quantum Nexus Workshop on Quantum Transduction

November 14-15, 2019

The Northwest Quantum Nexus (NQN) is assembling together experts across many qubit platforms to define and seek solutions to the outstanding challenges in qubit transduction for a workshop at the University of Washington. This workshop is supported by NSF under Award 1936932.

Learn More

University of Washington – Colloquium with Charlie Marcus

October 13-16, 2019

Charlie Marcus is Scientific Director of Microsoft Quantum Lab Copenhagen and Professor at the Niels Bohr Institute at the University of Copenhagen. Charlie Marcus will be giving a talk on “Majorana zero modes: a new kind of ‘particle,’ in conjunction with Microsoft and the University of Washington Department of Physics.

Learn More

Cascadia Innovation Corridor Conference

October 2-3, 2019

The Cascadia Innovation Corridor Conference brings together business, academic, and government leaders from both sides of the border to explore new strategies for the region to come together, maximize our shared competitive advantages, and elevate our global economic position. This year’s conference will showcase a vison for life in the Cascadia Corridor in 2035, celebrate the accomplishments of the Cascadia Steering Committee, and offer opportunities to contribute to seven working groups. During the vision for life in the Cascadia Corridor in 2035 there will be a breakout session on quantum computing featuring  1QBit, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Microsoft.

Learn More

TRIUMF Science Week

August 23, 2019

TRIUMF Science Week is a wonderful opportunity for the whole TRIUMF community to come together, exchange ideas, and learn about the multidisciplinary program of the British Columbia, Canada-based lab. This year’s program features a summer school for the Institute for Advanced Medical Isotopes; a workshop to discuss the first science of the Advanced Rare Isotope Laboratory era with the Canadian Rare Isotope Facility with Electron Beam Ion Source; a symposium celebrating 20 years of Isotope Separator and Accelerator science; the TRIUMF Users’ Group Annual General Meeting; and a data science and quantum computing workshop.

Learn More

Microsoft Faculty Summit

July 17-18, 2019

The Faculty Summit brings together the intellectual power of researchers from across Microsoft and academia. We are excited that this year’s Faculty Summit investigates how researchers are augmenting, improving and even changing the future of work with a special break out workshop on “Transforming Our Future – Quantum Computing and Workforce, Curriculum, and Application Development.”

Learn More

D-Wave – University of Washington Seminar

Jun 6, 2019

University of Washington Institute for Nano-Engineered Systems, in partnership with UW QuantumX Initiative and the Northwest Quantum Nexus, is hosting Jeremy Hilton, Senior Vice President of Technology and Applications, D-Wave Systems, to discuss Applications of Quantum Computing.

Learn More

NQN Summit

March 18-19, 2019

A coalition led by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Microsoft and the University of Washington convened in Seattle for an inaugural summit to launch the Northwest Quantum Nexus (NQN). This Summit establishes a center of geographic and intellectual gravity in the Northwest, where a talent pool can flourish and contribute to the quantum economy, through knowledge sharing, skill and experience development, research impacts, and community engagement.

Learn More